Diva's Corner

***New Artist Alert**** Introducing “Lantana”

It seems as if every day a new rapper is born.  But it’s not every day that you come across a young black male who isn’t into Hip-Hop’s latest beef, isn’t impressed by the buffoonery of what most of today’s music is about and wants no part of the easy route that today’s rapper seems […]

New Artist Lantana

It seems as if every day a new rapper is born.  But it’s not every day that you come across a young black male who isn’t into Hip-Hop’s latest beef, isn’t impressed by the buffoonery of what most of today’s music is about and wants no part of the easy route that today’s rapper seems to take by spitting elementary rhymes over knocking beats, camouflaging the weakness of their lyrics.

Lantana is coming in the game and leaving the gimmicks and bullshit behind.  Alas, real Hip-Hop seems to be on its way back.  

Ayana: Thank you for taking the time to sit with me Lantana!

Lantana: You’re welcome.

Ayana: First things first. Where are you from?

Lantana: I’m from College Hill out of Cincinnati, Ohio.

Ayana: Okay, Ohio about to be on the map!

Lantana: Yeah!

Ayana:  Why the name Lantana?

Lantana:  Lantana is the first street I lived on in College Hill. Growing up they called me “Easy” but when I went away, a good friend of mine started calling me Lantana when he found out I was from College Hill. It stuck with me and it represents for my
people.

Ayana:  We have so many rappers in the mix right now to the point where nobody stands out anymore. Everybody seems to be reading from the same text book “Rappers for Dummies.” Out of all of these rappers, who inspired you to become an artist and why?

Lantana: Growing up it was Tupac, it didn’t matter what he was rapping about. He wasn’t always very lyrical but he made you feel him. I listened to a lot of Cash Money the 400 Degreez album. The Hot Boyz had a big influence on me making music. I can’t leave out Jay-Z, not just the music but the way he handles business. I have a lot of respect for people who have that type of longevity in the music industry being consistent.

Ayana: What are some of your views on the direction of where Hip-Hop is going?

Lantana: In these days it’s sad to say but it’s not all about the talent if you don’t have the grind it won’t matter how good you can put a verse together.  Having talent nowadays is a plus but if your lazy it’s not likely to happen, therefore you get a lot of weak music in the light because people are grinding and putting in work for you to see it. At the end of the day it’s up to the people. Whoever gets the people on their side is winning.

Ayana: I agree with you 100% on that. Hip-Hop has definitely become a popularity contest over a lyrical content contest.  What do you think the game is missing and what do you believe you can bring to it?

Lantana: It’s missing the feeling. A lot of artists are trying to please people instead of being themselves. Honestly I can only be me. I say what I feel. I don’t worry about trying to be complex. I just want people to feel where I’m coming from. I want to bring that motivation back, that authentic music put out there and make people accept me for me and be consistent I plan on being here.

Ayana:  If you could battle any rapper who would it be?

Lantana: I used to be big on battle rapping, but now as a man it doesn’t fit my character. I can watch it but that’s as far as it go to much disrespect.

Ayana: So much disrespect! I’ve seen some battle raps that should have ended in a gun fight. I promise you. I’m not one for violence but man these battle rappers will say anything! There’s definitely a lack of respect when it comes to battle rapping.  So you seem to be above the bullshit which is always a great thing, so since you’re not a battle rapper, what would you describe your style as?

Lantana: Motivational, relatable and on topic. Authentic shit.

Ayana:  Have you worked with any major artists and who would you like to
work with in the future?

Lantana: I haven’t worked with any major artist yet it isn’t a big focus for me right now but if I can get that Hov feature I’m with it.

Ayana:  What’s your take on “beef” in Hip-Hop.

Lantana: I really can’t get into that shit I got people doing life right now for murder and I got people dead and gone so all that gangsta shit really don’t impress me. I understand it but niggas rapping because they want to get out the streets but when they get in the game still feel they got something to prove. If it’s real it’s real but if you on twitter talking shit what’s the point. Niggas be 30 year old millionaires talking bout they trying to fight what sense do that make?

Ayana: It doesn’t make any sense at all. A million dollars would allow me to buy peace, no beef (laughs) There doesn’t seem to be any female rap artists out right now and there hasn’t been for a long time. Do you think Hip-Hop is suffering without female artists?

Lantana: I can’t say its suffering it’s just got to be the right artist and Nicki Minaj making it hard for the competition.

Ayana:  As an artist what do you hope to accomplish in the next 5 years?

Lantana: As an artist I want to reach as many people as I can I want to change the culture or at least make my mark.

Ayana:  It was a pleasure Lantana and I wish you much success in the future! Please leave the readers with some information on where they can find your music and information on Lantana

Lantana: You can reach me on twitter @Lantanaeasy  and on Facebook/allhustlenoluck.

-Yaya

Facebook.com/AyanaEllis

Twitter@AyanaEllis

ByAyanaEllis.com

Books by Ayana Ellis on Amazon.com

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Written by yaya2012